Question 7

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Question 7

Post  Emerie Pettit on Wed May 04, 2011 10:55 pm

There is definitely no beginning, middle, or end in this book. It is a collection of stories that are related, instead of being one story that is written chronologically. The stories are all related not only in the fact that they are in some way about the Vietnam War, but also they tend to foreshadow each other. O’Brien definitely made use of foreshadowing throughout the book because he would give a bit of detail in one chapter, then in a following chapter would end up going into further detail on the certain event. An example of this would be when he mentions the deaths of people like Curt Lemon, Ted Lavender, and Kiowa before he actually went into detail of how or when they died, which he did in later chapters.

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Re: Question 7

Post  devonfelts on Wed May 04, 2011 11:01 pm

i agree, there is no set structure to this novel, and it tends to jump around from chapter to chapter. Although one chapter may be in the past, and then the future, and then the past again, each one relates to what is going on in each mans life. As for the foreshadowing, i agree with that too. The deaths were touched on briefly in some chapters, and then explained more thoroughly as the novel continued.

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Re: Question 7

Post  Admin on Fri May 06, 2011 12:19 pm

Emerie Pettit wrote:There is definitely no beginning, middle, or end in this book. It is a collection of stories that are related, instead of being one story that is written chronologically. The stories are all related not only in the fact that they are in some way about the Vietnam War, but also they tend to foreshadow each other. O’Brien definitely made use of foreshadowing throughout the book because he would give a bit of detail in one chapter, then in a following chapter would end up going into further detail on the certain event. An example of this would be when he mentions the deaths of people like Curt Lemon, Ted Lavender, and Kiowa before he actually went into detail of how or when they died, which he did in later chapters.
Emerie what was O'Brien's purpose for setting the book up this way? What effect did it have on the reader? You need to be more specific and in-depth of your evaluation of the question.

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